Wine Photo Workshops » Dedicated to Photographer-Wine Adventurers Passionate About Their Craft

Masthead header

Photographing Winery Landscapes

Photographing Winery Landscapes

A Few Quick Tips on Photographing Landscapes at Wineries

“What I like to drink most is wine that belongs to others.” ~ Diogenes , 320 BC, Greek philosopher

My good friend Ken Sklute is an amazingly talented photographer.  A bit of a photographic savant in a good way. Way back when we first, one of the first things brought up when discussing landscape photography, he said:  “Landscapes must have a foreground, a middle ground and a background.”  Look at classical landscape paintings, to the beginnings of photography to contemporary photographic landscapes, the same still holds true.  A foreground, a middle ground and a background certainly makes for a compelling and visually interesting landscape photograph.  Below are a few classic examples and some landscapes I’ve photographed over the years.

Canaletto_1024-768

Canaletto: “The Regatta seen from Ca Foscari”, 1727 – London, National Gallery: Giovanni Antonio Canal -Canaletto- is by far the most famous Venetian 18th century painter. Among his pupils we found Guardi, Bellotto or Moretti, among others

Ansel Adams The Tetons and the Snake River

Ansel Adams The Tetons and the Snake River

Even thought the two images above are a Venetian cityscape and a landscape, well…you get the idea….foregroud, middle ground, background can be applied to any landscape and any photograph.

“This remains a favorite of mine over the years.  Technically, its super simple, but it just resonates with me.  It reminds me of the spring.”

The landscape above was a photographed quickly but composed carefully.  I was traveling with my friend Paulina Westerlind and amazing photographer and mommy of two beautiful boys who all live in Sweden.  We pulled over for a moment and I used the flowers as a the foreground, the vineyards act as a middle ground and the background is the top of the vineyard hill and the blue sky.  The white flowers in the foreground, because of their contrast draw your eye to the bottom of the image, while the  vertical rows of vines take your eye to the top of the image.  This remains a favorite of mine over the years.  Technically, its super simple, but it just resonates with me.  It reminds me of the spring.  This landscape was photographed about 10 years ago with an Canon EOS 1D Mark II, a 24-70mm 2.8 L., handheld at f14. See the digram below for a geometric breakdown.
oregon winery photographer
While traveling to Oregon, from San Francisco last summer my wife and I stopped into famed Domain Drouhin.  What you see above is a winery that was on the opposite side of the road of the Drouhin property.  Luckily that day, there were some wispy clouds in the sky.  Clouds are what landscape photographers love.  They create interest in the sky.  A blue sky is beautiful, but give me some clouds and I’m in heaven.  This image is photographed with my Olympus OMD EM5 and a 45mm 1.8 prime at f9. You can read my real world review of this amazing camera here.  Because the camera has 5 way image stabilization built into it, your are able to achieve bitingly sharp handheld images.  There are some interesting geometric lines happening in the landscape.  See the diagram below.  Again here, you’ll see a foreground {the hilled row of vines}, a middle ground {the horizontal dense green of vines} and the background {the red roofed home, tall trees and the blue sky with clouds}.
organic agriculture photographer

Blessed with an amazing clouds, a lovely sunset and the staggering 105 degree July heat, this landscape was captured across the lavender fields of Bear Flag Organic Farm in Sacramento.  After learning the basic rules of landscape photography I like to break them a bit. I enjoy burying the landscape at the bottom of the frame.  I’m still using the simple rule of foreground {the Lavender field}, middle ground {the orchard trees and home} and background –  sky and clouds.  These amazing clouds really make the composition possible.  Here is a clear reminder of what happens when your sensor is dirty.  See the little specs of sensor dirt in the sky?  I left them their on purpose to show what happens when you either forget to clean your sensor on a regular basis or simply don’t clean it at all.  I always have a clean sensor these days because I take my Visible Dust system with me on my travels.  Photographed on July 18th, 2006 with a Canon EOS 1D Mark II with a 24-70mm 2.8 L at f16 on a tripod.
Whatever you choose to photograph put your heart into it.  Some of these landscape were photographed before Adobe Lightroom was around.  These days, I don’t do much of anything to my landscapes in Photoshop.  Rather almost 100% of the post processing is done in Adobe Lightroom.  Occasionally I’ll use NIK filters Sharpener Pro to sharpen my images, but that’s about it.

 


Marc Weisberg is a photographer, educator, chef, former wine buyer, cellar master; and lover of wine. Marc owns and operates a successful Southern California based photography studio, founded in 2001, and is the founder of Wine Photo Workshops. His work is widely published and sought out by luxury brands. Wine Photo Workshops are for photographer-wine-adventurers and image makers. We’ll visit and explore wineries and food destinations throughout the world. Visit with Sommeliers, wine makers, vineyard owners and restauranteurs, with special behind the scenes access. You’ll have the opportunity to learn, make new friends, have fun and raise the bar on your photography skills. Contact Marc by phone 949.494.5084, or email.

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*